For the latest version of the Southend-on-Sea Climate Action Plan visit our database

Yesterday, the Cabinet at @SouthendBC declared a climate emergency. Southend Council will now be adopting radical policies to move to carbon neutrality by 2030.

Under Labour, our council is finally taking the environment seriously, and responding to the climate crisis. pic.twitter.com/AdYpLrtGmV

— Southend Labour (@SouthendLabour) September 18, 2019

Southend-Notice-of-Motion-Climate-Change

For the latest version of the Torbay Climate Action Plan visit our database

#Torbay has declared a Climate Emergency – here’s why https://t.co/7Y73qTdRqI

— Ed Oldfield (@Ed_Oldfield) June 20, 2019


Torbay decision Notice of Motion – Climate Change

For the latest version of the Redcar & Cleveland Climate Action Plan visit our database

Well done Redcar & Cleveland council! Climate emergency declared!

Will Middlesbrough Council follow suit? https://t.co/nwoYBnMWgP

— Hannah Graham ???? (@hannarrr_) March 29, 2019

RESOLVED that on the successful motion by Councillor King and duly
seconded by Councillor Mason that:
This Council notes:
1. Humans have already caused irreversible climate change, the
impacts of which are being felt on communities, natural habitats,
and biodiversity levels around the world. Global temperatures
have already increased by 1.1 degree Celsius from pre-industrial
levels. This is mainly due to build-up of atmospheric carbon
dioxide levels released by burning fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide
levels are now at 410 ppm (and still increasing) compared to
280ppm before the industrial revolution. If nothing changes this
would lead to temperatures far above those deemed to be safe for
the current global ecosystem and would cause great hardship for
humanity.
2. In order to reduce the chance of runaway global warming and limit
the effects of climate breakdown, it is imperative that we do all we
can reduce our CO2eq (carbon equivalent) emissions from their
current 6.5 tonnes per person per year to less than 2 tonnes as
soon as possible.
3. Society needs to change its laws, taxation, infrastructure, etc., to
make low carbon living easier and the new norm. There is
overwhelming evidence indicating that human activity has resulted
in global climate change that threatens our future and those of
generations to come. It is clear that we must all take significant
steps to address our lifestyles immediately in order to slow and, in
time, reverse this damage. In our position as a local authority, we
have a crucial role to play in leading by example, influencing the
way that the residents and businesses of the Borough live and
work and supporting everyone to make the necessary changes in
their lives and work.

4. Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council has already shown
foresight and leadership when it comes to addressing the issue of
carbon emissions. The scheme to convert street lamps from
sodium to more efficient LED bulbs will result in the reduction of
carbon emissions by more than 1,000 tonnes every year including
a fall in energy consumption of more than 50%, our Greenhouse
Gas emissions have already been reduced by 13.2% from 2016/7,
this council has improved the energy efficiency of its buildings
and officers are currently working towards signing the UK 100
pledge to meet commitments made both nationally and
internationally at the Paris Summit for 100% clean energy by 2050
and officers are currently supporting the Council to engage in and
explore initiatives including – The ‘RE100’ – a voluntary initiative
led by The Climate Group where organisations commit to sourcing
their supply of electricity by renewables, The ‘UK100’ – another
voluntary initiative led by a network of local government leaders
across the UK looking to move the borough to 100% clean energy
by 2050 and The ‘Emissions Reduction Pledge 2020’ – a voluntary
initiative led by UK Government and targeting a reduction in all
greenhouse gas emissions of 30% by 2020/21 (compared to a
2009/10 baseline).
5. Unfortunately, these plans and actions are not enough as the
world is already on track to overshoot the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C
limit before 2050.

6. The IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, published
in Autumn 2018, describes the enormous harm that a 2°C rise is
likely to cause compared to a 1.5°C rise, and reported that limiting
global warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action
from all citizens and authorities.
7. Councils around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate
Emergency’ and committing resources to address this emergency,
and at least 12 Councils in the UK have passed motions declaring
a Climate Emergency.
This Council acknowledges that:

It is proud of the work undertaken by Officers and Members in recent
years to start to address the causes and impact of Climate Change in the
Borough and beyond. However, there is much more that needs to be
done and the Council knows that effective action to address these issues
will take time to implement. We cannot expect residents to change their
habits if we are not prepared to lead by example in the fight against
climate change and the resulting habitat and biodiversity loss for the sake
of everyone in the Borough both now and in the future.

All governments (national, regional and local) have a duty to limit the
negative impacts of climate breakdown, habitat destruction and
biodiversity loss and that Local Governments should not rely on national
Government instruction to change their policies. It is important for the
residents of Redcar and Cleveland and the rest of the UK that
communities commit to carbon neutrality as soon as possible.
The consequences of global temperature rising above 1.5°C are so
severe that preventing this from happening should be humanity’s number
one priority.
Bold climate action can deliver benefits to the local, national and
international community and improved well-being for people and wildlife
worldwide.
This Council resolves to:
1. Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’;
2. Pledge to take action with a view to making the Borough of Redcar
and Cleveland carbon neutral by 2030, taking into account both
production and consumption emissions;
3. Recognises that to achieve this national government must provide
the powers and resources to make the 2030 target possible. This
must include protecting our manufacturing industry and associated
jobs by facilitating an industrial Carbon Capture Storage and
Utilisation (CCSU) network in our Borough including:
• Backing the development of the clean gas low-carbon
electricity generation project at the South Tees Development
Corporation by providing the necessary support and funding, in
particular by agreeing a Contract For Difference (CFD) to
provide the clear, stable and predictable revenue that is
needed to make this project viable.
• Putting the necessary legislation in place to make the transport
and storage infrastructure for carbon sequestration a nationally
regulated asset (like the national grid) to ensure the risks of
setting up and running a CCSU network are properly managed
and owned.
4. Work with other local and regional Governments (both within the
UK and internationally) to determine and implement best practice
methods to limit Global Warming to less than 1.5C;
5. Continue to work with partners across the Borough, region and
neighbouring authorities to deliver this new goal through all
relevant strategies and plans; and,
6. Report to the Borough Council within six months with the actions
the Council will take to play its part in addressing this emergency.

For the latest version of the City of York Climate Action Plan visit our database

York to declare climate emergency after young people make their voices heard https://t.co/ubz6ugUHTl #climatestrike

— Kirsten Carter (@Sealemonsrock) March 23, 2019

The Motion, proposed by Cllr. Andy D’Agorne

Declare a Climate Emergency
“Council notes:
1. Humans have already caused irreversible climate
change, the impacts of which are being felt around the
world. Global temperatures have already increased by
1 degree Celsius from pre-industrial levels.
Atmospheric CO2 levels are above 400 parts per
million (ppm). The latest report from the InterGovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in
October 2018 gave us 12 years to implement changes
to keep global warming to a maximum of 1.5 degrees
in order to avoid widespread drought, food scarcity,
heat related deaths and loss of biodiversity including
insects and vital food crop pollinators.
2. At present the world is on track to overshoot the Paris
Agreement’s 1.5°C limit before 2050. In order to
reduce the chance of runaway global warming and limit
the effects of climate breakdown, it is imperative that
we as a species reduce our CO2eq (carbon
equivalent) emissions from their current 6.5 tonnes per
person per year to less than 2 tonnes as soon as
possible.
3. Individuals cannot be expected to make this reduction
on their own. Society needs to change its laws,
taxation, and infrastructure to make low carbon living
easier and the new norm.
4. Carbon emissions result from both production and
consumption.
5. City of York Council has already made some positive
progress, but this is not enough. More can and must
be done. The Independent Panel on Climate Change
in its Oct. 2018 report was very clear that action from
all parts of society is necessary and local government
has a responsibility to lead the way.
6. City councils around the world are responding by
declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and taking action to
address this emergency.
Council believes that:
1. All levels of government (national, regional and local)
have a duty to limit the negative impacts of climate
breakdown. Local councils that recognise this should
not wait for their national governments to change
their policies.
2. Cities are uniquely placed to lead the world in
reducing carbon emissions, as they are in many ways
easier to decarbonise than rural areas.
3. The consequences of global temperature rising
above 1.5°C are so severe that preventing this from
happening must be humanity’s number one priority.
4. Bold local climate action can deliver economic and
social benefits in terms of new green jobs, economic
savings and market opportunities, as well as much
improved well-being for York residents – for example
through reducing fuel poverty and energy bills,
encouraging healthy, active travel and improving
green spaces and access to nature.
Council calls on the Executive to:
1. Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’.
2. Commit to a target of making York carbon neutral by
2030, taking into account both production and
consumption emissions (scope 1, 2 and 3 of the
Greenhouse Gas Protocol).
3. Request a report within six months setting out the
immediate actions the Council will take to address
this emergency and a plan to measure annual citywide progress towards meeting the 2030 target.
4. Work with partners across the city and across the
region to deliver this new goal through all relevant
strategies and plans and drawing on local and global
best practice.
5. Actively lobby the Government to provide the
additional powers and resources needed to meet the
2030 target.”

For the latest version of the Portsmouth Climate Action Plan visit our database

#Portsmouth declares a climate emergency and pledges to create an action plan to clean up the city’s air.
Nitrogen Dioxide emissions are breaking legal levels at 16 monitoring sites in the city.
Campaigners outside were lobbying for tough swift action @PompeyLabour @pompeygreens pic.twitter.com/1C3TLuMTjj

— BBC Radio Solent (@BBCRadioSolent) March 19, 2019

Link to News Article

Proposal to Declare a Climate Emergency in Portsmouth

Proposed by Councillor Judith Smyth

Seconded by Councillor Thomas Coles

We are in the middle of a climate emergency which poses a threat to our health, our planet and our children’s and grandchildren’s future. (Sadiq Khan London Mayor)

The UK exceeded the scientifically agreed safe level of CO2 in the atmosphere (350ppm) sometime in the late 1990s. Since then we have been gambling with the lives of future generations and other species. Today we have reached the point where, even if we stopped all production of fossil fuelled cars, buses, trains, ships and planes and built no more gas or coal power stations, we would still only have a 64% chance of keeping below the 1.5°C target agreed in Paris in 2015. [1] [2] [3] [4]

In Portsmouth we have very high levels of air pollution on some streets where people live, cycle and walk exposing people to dangerous chemicals. Children are particularly vulnerable. We have also had several breaches to sea defences and are vulnerable to flooding.

48 UK local authorities have declared a climate emergency including Cornwall, the Forest of Dean, Bristol, Lambeth, Nottingham, Lancaster, Brighton and Hove, and Milton Keynes [5]. 72 cities around the world have also declared a climate emergency committing resources to address this emergency [6].

A climate emergency declared by a local authority can be a powerful catalyst for community wide action when paired with a clear action plan. There is no time to waste if we are to avoid the consequences of a rise in global warming above 1.5°C.

We propose that Portsmouth City council asks the Cabinet to Declare a Climate emergency to give a compelling lead to citizens, businesses and other partners of the urgency to reduce our carbon footprint to zero by 2030.

Portsmouth City council has started this journey. CO2 emissions in Portsmouth have reduced from 1243.5 kilotons in 2005 to 817.9 kilotons in 2016 and the City council has recognised that to avoid the worst impacts of climate change further reductions are needed. [7] [8] Several separate initiatives are underway. For example, electric car charging points, tree planting, investment in the new plastics recycling plant required to recycle more plastics jointly with Hampshire and Southampton by constructing a new Integra plant and the ‘cough, cough’ campaign together with reduction of carbon footprint of council premises and services.

However, this is somewhat disjointed and too slow. What is needed is action. Working with local business and other partners we need to develop and agree an ambitious city-wide strategy and clear action plans leading to rapid action which is openly monitored, well led and well governed. We need to enthuse and involve citizens, including young people, in generating ideas and support for green policies, plans and action. We can lead the way as a Green City.

Portsmouth City council will ask the Cabinet to:

  1. Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’ then ask partners to sign up including local business, schools and community groups.
  2. Pledge to achieve net zero carbon emissions in the Portsmouth by 2030, considering, both production and consumption of emissions according to the Standard provided by the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol6.
  3. Require the Leader of the Council to report back to the Council within six months with an action plan, detailing how the Council will work with partners across the City and with central government to ensure that Portsmouth’s net carbon emissions (Scope 1, Scope 2 and Scope 3 emissions as defined by the GHG Protocol) are reduced to zero by 2030.
  4. Provide an annual report on Portsmouth GHG emissions, what is working and what is more challenging and progress towards achieving net zero-carbon emissions.
  5. Require the Chief Executive to establish a ‘Portsmouth Climate Change Board’ before the end of July 2019, equivalent to that of Manchester, to underpin our efforts to decarbonise Portsmouth.
  6. Write to the government requesting (a) additional powers and funding to make the 2030 target possible and (b) that ministers work with local government and other governments to ensure that the UK maximizes carbon reduction by 2030 in line with the overriding need to limit global warming to a maximum of 1.5°C.
  7. Develop and implement a community engagement plan to i) fully inform residents about the need for urgent action on climate change ii) offer a vision of a healthier, more child friendly and greener city that is a model of best practice iii) mobilise residents in the delivery of the action plan

[1]Hansen J, Sato M, Kharecha P, Beerling D, Berner R, et al. (2008) Target Atmospheric CO2: Where Should Humanity Aim? The Open Atmospheric Science Journal 2: 217–231.

[2]Hansen J, Kharecha P, Sato M, Masson-Delmotte V, Ackerman F, Beerling DJ, et al. (2013) Assessing “Dangerous Climate Change”: Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature. PLoS ONE 8(12): e81648.

[3]IPCC, (2018) Global Warming of 1.5°C. An IPCC Special Report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty [Masson-Delmotte, V., P. Zhai, H.-O. Pörtner, D. Roberts, J. Skea, P.R. Shukla, A. Pirani, Moufouma-Okia, C. Péan, R. Pidcock, S. Connors, J.B.R. Matthews, Y. Chen, X. Zhou, M.I. Gomis, E. Lonnoy, Maycock, M. Tignor, and T. Waterfield (eds.)]. World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 32 pp.

[4]Campaign against Climate Change. (2019). Councils declaring climate emergency: new hope for climate action?, from https://www.campaigncc.org/councils_climate_emergency

[5]C40 Cities. (2019). Deadline 2020., from https://www.c40.org/other/deadline-2020

[6]Greenhouse Gas Protocol.(2019). GHG Protocol Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard. [Bhatia, P., Cummis, C., Brown, A., Rich, D., Drauker, L., Lahd, H.] Greenhouse Gas Protocol, Washington, USA.

[7]Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.(2018) Local Authority Carbon Dioxide Emissions Estimates 2016. London: Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

[8]Portsmouth City Council. (2019). Climate change – Portsmouth’s priorities., from https://www.portsmouth.gov.uk/ext/environment/green-living/climate-change—portsmouths-priorities

For the latest version of the BANES Action Plan visit our database

Watch @bathnes council pass their climate emergency motion incl opposition to expansion of Bristol Airport. Fantastic cross-party support & commitment https://t.co/U9UvvCtZJs (vote at 3.06:15). We look forward to working with them on meaningful programme of participation & action

— CSE (@cse_bristol) March 15, 2019

The Joint motion from Councillor Rob Appleyard (Liberal Democrat) and Councillor Mark Shelford
(Conservative): Bath and North East Somerset Declaring a Climate Emergency and Joining UK100 Club

This Council acknowledges;
● The devastating impacts that climate change and global temperature increases will have on the lives and livelihoods of people around the world, including on the health, safety and wellbeing of B&NES residents;
● The urgent need for action to be taken fast enough for there to be a chance of further climate
change being limited to avoid the worst impacts of drought, floods, extreme heat and poverty
for hundreds of millions of people;
● The opportunity for individuals and organisations at all levels to take action on reducing carbon emissions, from both production and consumption;
● The need to enable low carbon living across society through changes to laws, taxation,
infrastructure, policies and plans;
● The historic commitments made at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris regarding the future of renewable energy;
● That global temperatures have already increased by 1oC compared to pre-industrial levels, are still rising, and are on track to overshoot the Paris Agreement limit before 2050;
● That the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Special Report (November 2018) makes
clear the need to ensure global carbon emissions start to decline well before 2030 to avoid
overshoot and enable global warming to be limited to 1.5˚C;
● Our responsibility to help secure an environmentally sustainable future for our residents and in relation to the global effects of anthropogenic climate change.
This Council subsequently notes that;
● Despite the Paris Agreement placing no binding commitments upon local government
institutions, we as a Council can still play our part in the global movement towards a sustainable
energy future, this is evidenced in recent reports which show with ambitious action from
national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, indigenous peoples and
local communities, further climate change can be limited;
● The UK is well placed to contribute to this, drawing upon our existing industrial base, rooted in
an industrial heritage which once before revolutionised the global energy economy to the great
benefit of humankind;
● B&NES is well-placed to champion both rural and urban decarbonisation through renewable
energy, energy efficiency, smart energy development, zero carbon homes, local & sustainable
food, sustainable travel, carbon sequestration;
● The Council is already working on a number of these issues including, for example, work to
ensure the new Local Plan ensures zero carbon development and that the Council-owned ACL
builds its new homes to that standard;
● More needs to be done to enable Bath and wider area’s high number of listed buildings to be
made more energy efficient, through pressure on central government and Heritage England;
● The development of green industries can deliver economic benefits through creating well-paid,
high-skilled employment locally, regionally and nationally as well as improved wellbeing for
people worldwide;
● The West of England Energy Strategy Framework has been agreed as a starting point for
developing ambitious plans to support action on climate change;
● The UK100 Agreement pledge includes the ambition to enable all the UK’s cities, towns, villages and rural areas to exceed the Paris Climate targets through achieving 100% ‘clean energy’ before 2050, but in discussion have agreed to support B&NES aiming to achieve the pledge by 2030.
Therefore, this Council resolves to;
Declare a Climate Emergency;
Pledge to provide the leadership to enable Bath & North East Somerset to become carbon
neutral by 2030;
Sign up to the UK100 Pledge to provide the strategic community leadership needed to enable
our communities to achieve 100% clean energy across all sectors in Bath & North East Somerset
by 2030, as a logical step from the B&NES Environmental Sustainability Vision Motion passed
unanimously by Council in July 2018, and as a way to enable carbon neutrality by 2030;
Request that the Cabinet takes steps to identify work streams and budgets with the aim of
making B&NES Council carbon neutral by 2030, across all functions, as our contribution to
fighting climate change;
Engage and work in partnership with our partners in the public, private and community sectors
including the West of England Combined Authority and central government to facilitate bold
action to ensure Bath & North East Somerset is able to play its role in helping the UK to deliver
against the commitments made nationally and internationally at the 2015 Paris Summit;
Instruct Cabinet to work with the West of England Combined Authority (WECA) and our West of
England partners to produce an ambitious delivery plan for the West of England Energy Strategy
to use as a key tool for seeking government funding to help us deliver our 2030 target;
Update the B&NES Environmental Sustainability & Climate Change Strategy in line with this
pledge, and, with our partners across the community, to develop an action plan and ‘route
map’ to a sustainable, low carbon future for our community;
Request a report to Council in 6 months’ time on the progress with an annual report on
progress to full Council thereafter;
Launch real two-way engagement with the public to:
o Improve “carbon literacy” of all citizens;
o Encourage and support leadership on this issue in all sectors of society;
o Obtain meaningful public input into the B&NES Environmental Sustainability & Climate
Change Strategy and action planning;
o Facilitate wide community engagement and behavioural change.

The Petition signed by 2100 people:
We the undersigned are petitioning Bath and North East Somerset Council because:
1. Humans have already caused irreversible climate change, the impacts of which are being felt around the world. Global temperatures have already increased by 1 degree Celsius from pre-industrial levels. Atmospheric CO2 levels are above 400 parts per million (ppm). This far exceeds the 350 ppm deemed to be a safe level for humanity;
2. In order to reduce the chance of runaway Global Warming and limit the effects of Climate Breakdown, it is imperative that we as a species reduce our CO2eq (carbon equivalent) emissions from their current 6.5 tonnes per person per year to less than 2 tonnes as soon as possible;
3. Individuals cannot be expected to make this reduction on their own. Society needs to change its laws, taxation,
infrastructure, etc., to make low carbon living easier and the new norm;
4. Carbon emissions result from both production and consumption;
5. Bath and North East Somerset Council has already shown foresight and leadership when it comes to addressing the issue of Climate Breakdown by supporting the Our Power in B&NES green local energy scheme, the success of the waste recycling changes, and working with WECA to roll-out electric car charging points;
6. Unfortunately, our current plans and actions are not enough. The world is on track to overshoot the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit before 2050;
7. The IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, published in October, describes the enormous harm that a 2°C rise is likely to cause compared to a 1.5°C rise, and told us that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities;
8. Councils around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and committing resources to address this emergency.

References:
1. Fossil CO2 & GHG emissions of all world countries, 2017:
http://edgar.jrc.ec.europa.eu/overview.php?v=CO2andGHG1970-2016&dst=GHGpc [Accessed 10.12.18]
2. World Resources Institute: https://www.wri.org/blog/2018/10/8-things-you-need-know-about-ipcc-15-c-report
[Accessed 10.12.18]
3. The IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5ºC, pub 6/10/18: : https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sr15/
[Accessed 10.12.18]
4. Cross-party support for Bristol Climate Emergency measure: https://www.bristol247.com/news-and-features/news/bristol-declares-climate-emergency-and-pledges-to-become-carbon-neutral-by-2030/
[Accessed 10.12.18]
5. Green Party Bristol. (2018) Greens declare a Climate Emergency and bring Bristol’s CO2 emissions target forwards 20 years. Available at: https://bristolgreenparty.org.uk/news/greens-declare-a-climate-emergency-and-bring-bristols-co2-emissions-target-forwards-20-years [Accessed 10.12.18]

Therefore we petition B&NES council to resolve to:
1. Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’;
2. Pledge to make Bath and North East Somerset carbon neutral by 2030, taking into account both production and consumption emissions (scope 1, 2 and 3) Scope 1, 2 and 3 of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol explained:
https://www.carbontrust.com/resources/faqs/services/scope-3-indirect-carbon-emissions [Accessed 10.12.18]
3. Call on Westminster to provide the powers and resources to make the 2030 target possible;
4. Work with other governments (both within the UK and internationally) to determine and implement best practice
methods to limit Global Warming to less than 1.5°C;
5. Continue to work with partners across the city and region to deliver this new goal through all relevant strategies and plans;
6. Report to Full Council within six months with the actions the Council will take to address this emergency.

(Sign here. Please only sign IF you live, work or study in Bath and North East Somerset. Other signatures will be rejected by the council. Thank You!)

For the latest version of the North Somerset Climate Action Plan visit our database

Absolutely delighted that North Somerset Council has unanimously backed our call to target zero carbon by 2030 and declare a climate emergency. Huge thanks to all those members of the public who came to support or wrote to Councillors.

— Mike Bell (@ldmikebell) February 19, 2019

(1)       Climate Emergency Motion – Councillor Tom Leimdorfer (Green) and Councillor Mike Bell (LibDem)

“This council recognises:

  1. The challenge and threat of climate change to residents and global community.
  2. That to keep global warming below 1.5°C we must operate within a global carbon budget. In order to reduce the chance of runaway Global Warming and limit the effects of Climate Breakdown, we need to reduce our CO2eq (carbon equivalent) emissions from their current average of 6.5 tonnes per person per year to less than 2 tonnes as soon as possible.
  3. Individuals cannot be expected to make this reduction on their own. Society needs to change its laws, taxation and infrastructure, to make low carbon living easier.
  4. North Somerset Council has already shown foresight and leadership when it comes to addressing the issue of climate change, having reduced CO2 emissions by 28.5% between 2005 – 2015 and setting a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the equivalent of 5.8 tonnes per person, to 2.9 tonnes per person by 2035. (1)
  5. Unfortunately, current plans and actions are not enough. The world is on track toovershoot the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit before 2050 (2). The IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming (3) describes the enormous harm that a 2°C rise is  likely to cause compared to a 1.5°C rise, and told us that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector and local communities.
  1. Councils around the UK and the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and committing resources to address this emergency. (4)

This council will:

  1. Declare that it recognises a ‘Climate Emergency’.
  2. Take active steps to make North Somerset carbon neutral by 2030, taking into account both production and consumption emissions. (5)
  3. Call on Westminster to provide the powers and resources to make the 2030 target possible.
  4. Set up a cross-party Working Group to bring forward proposals and work with partners across the region to deliver this new goal through all relevant strategies and plans.
  5. Report to Full Council every six months with the actions the Council will take to address this emergency.”

https://www.n-somerset.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Climate-Local-Commitment-refresh-2018.pdf?fbclid=IwAR3PrkHcDBeWWmc1PA4Abhstpv-s_yvB1gsD2aJOELNQPuAXP0f1RTWr7Sg

https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-paris-agreement/the-paris-agreement

https://www.ipcc.ch/2018/10/08/summary-for-policymakers-of-ipcc-special-report-on-global-warming-of-1-5c-approved-by-governments

https://www.campaigncc.org/councils_climate_emergency

https://www.carbontrust.com/resources/faqs/services/scope-3-indirect-carbon-emissions/

For the latest version of the Cornwall Climate Action Plan visit our database

A short piece I wrote about #Cornwall Council’s #ClimateEmergencyhttps://t.co/798WevmLsB

— Alex Welsford (@al_welsford) January 29, 2019

Webcast of Climate Emergency’ debate

Amendment to Agenda No. 12.1 Urgency on Climate Change

Proposer: Councillor Kirkham

Seconder: Councillor Alvey

This Council resolves to:

  1. Declare a ‘climate emergency’*
  2. Call on Westminster to provide the powers and resources necessary to achieve the target for Cornwall to become the carbon neutral by 2030 and commit to working with other councils with similar ambitions;
  3. Provide adequate staff time and leadership to prepare a report within 6 months to establish how Cornwall can sufficiently reduce carbon emissions through energy efficiency, low carbon fuels and investment in renewable energy and other Council strategies, plans and contracts within the timescale which is consistent with an ambition to restrain global warming to 1.5 degrees centigrade. This will draw a scale of the actions Cornwall Council is already and will continue to take; and where possible, outline partners commitments to move towards a carbon neutral Cornwall by 2030.

*’Climate Emergency’ is an internationally recognised declaration being used by Councils and other Local Authorities, predominantly in the UK, Australia and the USA, to publicly declare concern over the IPCCs findings which recognise the adverse global impact of the changing climate.